Accessibility

We've designed this site to conform as well as possible with industry standards to make sure it’s accessible for you. However, there may be areas where we've not achieved this - if so please email us at ceopeducation@nca.x.gsi.gov.uk and we'll see if we can improve it

Tab key

You can use the Tab key on your keyboard to move between links on a page. A single press of a Tab highlights the next link, Shift+Tab highlights the previous link .

Changing browser settings

If you have a visual impairment or dyslexia, you may find making changes to your web browser settings help you use this web site.

  1. For example, to set Internet Explorer to ignore the colours and fonts used in web sites, first go to the ‘Tools’ menu Choose ‘Internet Options’.
  2. Click on the ‘Accessibility’ button, then tick the ‘ignore colours’, ‘ignore font styles’ and ‘ignore font sizes’ boxes.
  3. Click OK to apply the settings. 

Increasing text size

Some users might find screen text easier to read by increasing the size at which text is displayed. To do this you should simply adjust your browser's settings.

This tool is available in the menu of various browsers as follows:

  • Internet Explorer 5, 5.5, 6 (PC): View > Text size
  • Google Chrome: Zoom
  • Firefox, Netscape 8: View > Text size
  • Opera: View > Zoom
  • Netscape 6, 7, Mozilla: View > Text zoom
  • Safari (Mac): View > Make text bigger
  • Internet Explorer 5 (Mac): View > Text zoom

Changing colours

Users may wish to change the site's background colour further or change the colour of body text on the site. Both can be achieved by changing preferences in your browser.

Depending on your browser type use one of the following:

  • Internet Explorer: Tools > Internet Options > Colors
  • Netscape Navigator: Edit > Preferences > Appearance > Colors

Accessing PDFs

If you use a screen reader to access websites, you may find it useful to read how to access pdfs with a screen reader.

Where to get help

Visual impairment

Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) (merged with Action for Blind People) is a charity offering general information, advice and guidance for people with sight problems and sight loss.

Hearing loss

Action on Hearing Loss (formerly RNID) is a charity representing deaf and hard of hearing people.

AbilityNet provides free information and advice, individual assessment of technology needs, the supply of assistive technology with free support, a programme of awareness education, and consultancy for employers on system and workstation adaptations.

Physical disability

There is a guide to setting up voice recognition software here: www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility/guides/voice_recognition

AbilityNet provides free information and advice, individual assessment of technology needs, the supply of assistive technology with free support, a programme of awareness education, and consultancy for employers on system and workstation adaptations.

Headway provides support for people affected by brain injury and their families.

Scope runs a wide range of services for people with cerebral palsy, their families and carers

Learning disability

The Down’s Syndrome Association is a leading charity for people affected by the condition and their families.

The British Dyslexia Association aims to influence government and other institutions to promote a dyslexia friendly society.

Learning Disability Today provides advice and guidance on using assistive technology such as voice recognition

Mencap offers a helpline and publishes documents on how people with learning disabilities can use the internet safely

The National Autistic Society runs a helpline that provides help and advice.

Older people

Age UK provides support and care for older people, including computer courses and information on using technology.

General help with using a computer

 You can find guidance from the BBC about:

Childline

Are you being bullied?

If you are being bullied, or you are not ready to make a report to CEOP, you can talk to Childline anonymously online or on the phone - No worry is too big or too small.

Visit Childline